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2017 Solar Eclipse over Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Basic Info About the 2017 Solar Eclipse

Film_eclipse_soleil_1999
“Film eclipse soleil 1999”. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

At about 10:17am directly above Jackson, Wyoming on Monday, August 21st, 2017 a total solar eclipse will begin. The first 1 hour and 18 minutes or so will just be a partial eclipse. Then, at approximately 11:35am the Moon will pass directly in front of the Sun blocking out the majority of the Sun’s light. For the following 2 minutes and several seconds–the exact duration depends on your exact location–the Sun’s corona will be visible as pictured above in the center image of the 1999 eclipse. After that the Sun will be partially eclipsed until about 1pm Mountain Standard Time.

Where to Go to Watch the Eclipse

The line of totality of the eclipse goes right through Grand Teton National Park and neighboring Teton Valley. As you will be able to see on the image below the Jackson Hole Airport is situated right along the line of totality. However, the duration of totality will only vary by a few seconds from anywhere in the valley. While there are several pull-outs to park in along Highway 26/191/89, the Inner Park Loop, Gros Ventre Road, and Antelope Flats Road that would work well for viewing and taking pictures of the eclipse, those pull-outs will likely fill up fast on the morning of the eclipse. So, plan on getting there early! There are also plenty of public parks in downtown Jackson that will work well for viewing and photographing the eclipse.

Another amazing opportunity to watch the eclipse is from a high vantage point. By climbing one of the many peaks in Jackson Hole including, but not limited to: Snow King Mountain, Jackson Peak, Sheep Mountain, Mount Glory, Static Peak, or various other peaks in the Tetons you will have the opportunity to see the shadow cone of the Moon racing towards you from the West just before the moment of totality.

Lodging

If you are planning on staying in Jackson Hole for the 2017 solar eclipse, please note that almost every room in Jackson Hole is already booked. There may be lodging available in neighboring communities including: Driggs, Victor, Idaho Falls, Rexburg, Afton, and Alpine. Camping is also an option in Grand Teton National Park and in the surrounding National Forests, but except for group sites, it is first come first serve. Here is one other option for those of you traveling with RVs. It’s out in Eastern Wyoming, but it’s still on the eclipse path: Divide Ranch

Wyoming Stargazing has information about a few lodging possibilities that are still available in Jackson Hole. While we can’t book them for you, we’re happy to share the info with you if you email our Program Coordinator Rebecca Spitz.

Wyoming Stargazing Public Event for the Eclipse

Wyoming Stargazing will have some of our telescopes and leaders at a public eclipse event at Rendezvous park (R-Park) in Wilson, Wyoming. We’ll have solar glasses for purchase, a telescope with a white light solar filter and a hydrogen alpha telescope to give you incredible views of the Sun’s corona and flares during the total eclipse. During the week leading up to the eclipse and for a few days after it there will be stargazing programs and other daytime astronomy related events, locations TBD.

We’ll be updating this page with plenty more info so check back here for specific locations and times for the eclipse parties and stargazing events. You can also look at the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce Events Calendar for additional program being offered.

More Information

2017 Solar Eclipse Animation

For more information about the eclipse please check out the following resources:

2017 Solar Eclipse FAQs


How can I view the eclipse safely on my own?

2017 Jackson Hole Eclipse Solar Glasses

By using a pair of our custom-made solar eclipse glasses! Order as many pairs as you want here. They’ll keep you safe so you can watch totality happen in real time with your very own eyes!

What’s the difference between Jackson and Jackson Hole?

The town of Jackson, Wyoming is located in the southern end of a large valley called Jackson Hole. There is no such town as Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Grand Teton National Park encompasses much of the Jackson Hole Valley.

Will the eclipse pass over the town of Jackson or Grand Teton National Park?

Both! While the eclipse will be easily visible from town, many people will be heading into Grand Teton National Park for higher ground to see the Moon’s shadow cone.

Where can I make reservations for places to stay?

Almost every hotel room in Jackson is booked. You might want to try Air BnB

Wyoming Stargazing has a FEW options for lodging in Jackson Hole. Please email us if you are interested.

Optionally, Grand Teton National Park and the Bridger-Teton National Forest also have campgrounds throughout the area, but only a first-come, first-served basis. We recommend having something lined up in advance since campgrounds will fill up quickly.

Where can I make reservations for a rental car?

Thrifty and Dollar have bumped up their advanced booking time so you can make reservations now!

Will there be a free event with Wyoming Stargazing?

Yes, we plan on having a public event that will be free to attend. Location TBD

Can I watch it by myself in Grand Teton National Park somewhere?

There are a number of side-roads and pullouts in Grand Teton National Park that will provide great vantage points. Since Grand Teton National Park only allows camping in designated campgrounds, these pullouts and roads should be open the morning of the eclipse, but expect them to fill up fast as the eclipse approaches, likely over capacity.

I want to photograph the eclipse. Will it be over the Teton Mountains?

The eclipse occurs in the middle of the day when the sun will be high in the southeastern sky, so without a very wide-angle lens, catching it over the Tetons will be very tricky. Photographing shadows near the eclipse’s totality often yields interesting results though!

Does the 2017 solar eclipse pose any danger to us?

Only if the excitement is too much for you to contain! Please remember that the only time you can look directly at the Sun is during the 2 minutes of totality. The rest of the time you need to use an approved solar filter or solar glasses to protect your eyes.

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