The DRAFT Progression

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Detailed Analysis: Phase One

Summary

Phase One of this initiative is currently scheduled to be completed by the end of January 2020. That is one and a half years behind schedule due to a serious illness of the grant administrator, staffing shortages within the grant administrators organization, and initial setbacks in the planning stages of the grant. During the first year of the grant (Jan. 2018 – Dec. 2019) the grant administrator attended two important planning meetings with TCSD teachers and administrators. Several productive meetings also took place between representatives of key partner organizations and the grant administrator to discuss a strategic approach for creating the streamlined science progression. Several partner organizations submitted preliminary information about their current programming that became part of the science progression curriculum.

There were also several false starts in collecting information from prospective partner organizations. Electronic forms did not work correctly nor did they collect the essential information that was later deemed necessary for the project. Eventually the forms were corrected and invaluable face-to-face meetings took place with key partner organization representations. These lessons learned will accelerate the completion of Phase II and Phase III of this initiative. 

During the second year of the grant (Jan. 2019 – Dec. 2020) representatives of the partner organizations decided that a web-based approach to sharing the program information and K-5th grade pilot curriculum was the most effective approach to pursue. Gliffen Designs was hired to create those web pages on the grant administrator?s (Wyoming Stargazing) website until a permanent website was created for the initiative. The WordPress based webpages allow for easy and continuous partner organization access to input information, smooth graphical displays for end users, and downloadable reports of current implemented programs for administrators. The proposed K-5th grade streamlined science curriculum progression was crafted to balance elements of place-based education, phenological opportunities, the availability of instructors from partner organizations, a focus on classroom-based learning, and logical transitions between scientific disciplines.

Partner Organizations

The 13 partner organizations identified as contributors to science lessons in TCSD K-5th grade classrooms included (in alphabetical order):

Center of Wonder (Wonder Institute)

Grand Teton National Park (National Park Service)

National Elk Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

pARTners

Snake River Fund

Teton County Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling

Teton County Interagency Fire

Teton County Weed and Pest District

Teton Raptor Center

Escuelas de ciencias de Teton

The Cougar Fund

The Jackson Hole Children?s Museum

Wyoming Observación de estrellas

Programs and Standards

In total the 13 partner organizations implemented roughly 150 programs in TCSD K-5th grade classrooms during the 2018-2019 school year. 

8 of those programs were for Kindergarten; 

10 of those programs were for 1st grade; 

32 of those programs were for 2nd grade; 

39 of those programs were for 3rd grade; 

26 of those programs were for 4th grade; 

34 of those programs were for 5th grade. 

Within the WyCPS there are a total of 72 Science Standards for Kindergarten through 5th grade, as well as 6 multi-grade level Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science (ETS) Standards (three for K-2th grade and three for 3rd-4th grade). Of the total 78 WyCPS 48 (61%) were addressed to some extent:

5 of the Kindergarten Science Standards;  

5 of the 1st grade Science Standards; 

8 of the 2nd grade Science Standards;

9 of the 3rd grade Science Standards and the 3rd-5th ETS Standard; 

7 of the 4th grade Science Standards; 

13 (ALL) of the 5th grade Science Standards;

A brief analysis of the implemented programs shows that a disproportionate number of them are for 2nd-5th grade students and that the percentage of addressed standards are for those same grade levels. The partner organizations are aware of those discrepancies and are working to alleviate them. 

K-5th Grade Streamlined Science Curriculum

In considering a proposal for a K-5th grade streamlined science curriculum progression for TCSD the unique characteristics of the Jackson Hole community as well as the needs of TCSD teachers and administrators were taken into account. Four main criteria were utilized in the following order of importance: a focus on a classroom-based approach, logical transitions between scientific disciplines and their associated WyCPS, elements of place-based education and phenological opportunities, and the availability of instructors from partner organizations.

Firstly, a focus on classroom-based learning was used because of the relative ease of implementation in most cases, the higher cost in both money and time involved with busing students to different locations, and the relative ease of representations from partner organizations to visit the classrooms. 

Secondly, logical transitions between some scientific disciplines and the associated WyCPS for each grade level were identified and used as a basic structure for the progression whenever possible during one year and between years. 

Next, whenever feasible and when deemed necessary to achieve the optimal result from the lessons, elements of place-based education and phenological opportunities were proposed. Those later decisions follow a 40-year legacy in Jackson Hole begun by Jackson Hole High School science teacher Ted Major who began taking his students outside to learn geology, biology, life science,and ecology. To ignore the incredible potential of bringing students inside Grand Teton National Park, the surrounding National Forests, and Wildlife Refuges would be simply put a huge missed learning opportunity. Moreover, we took into account the key times of year when teaching lessons outside would increase their relevance. Some small deviations from the ?best fit? progression using the first three criteria were necessary to take into account the availability of instructors from partner organizations.

The Progression: Kindergarten

August-October

The Kindergarten progression begins with Forces and Interactions (K-PS2-1 and K-PS2-2). Having students explore and/or build their own simple machines can connect ideas of forces, speed, and energy. 

Current Partners:

The JH Children’s Museum

Potential Partners:

Wyoming Stargazing (Rube Goldberg Machines)

K-PS2-1 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

K-PS2-2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull.

November-December

Students progress to ideas of Energy using the Sun as an example (K-PS3-1). Students design and construct different types of shade structures using their new construction skills from the lessons used during the previous group of standards. (K-PS3-2, K-2-ETS1-1, K-2-ETS1-2, K-2-ETS1-3). 

Potential Partners:

The JH Children’s Museum 

Wyoming Stargazing (Kinesthetic Astronomy)

K-PS3-1 Energy

Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth?s surface.

K-PS3-2 Energy

Use tools and materials to design and build a structure that will reduce the warming effect of sunlight on an area.

K-2-ETS1-1 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.

K-2-ETS1-2 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

K-2-ETS1-3 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs.

January-February

The Sun can then be connected to the next topic as the source of all weather patterns on Earth (K-ESS2-1). Students explore different types of weather, including extreme weather, and learn about weather forecasting by making daily observations of the weather (K-ESS3-2). 

Potential Partners:

The JH Children’s Museum

Wyoming Stargazing (Weather Journals)

K-ESS2-1 Earth?s Systems

Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns overtime.  

K-ESS3-2 Earth and Human Activity

Ask questions to obtain information about the purpose of weather forecasting to prepare for, and respond to, severe weather. 

March-April

The way humans prepare for extreme weather can be connected to the idea of how we change our environment to suit our needs (K-ESS2-2). Then, students can explore how other animals and plants do the same (K-ESS2-2). That progresses naturally to the relationships of living things and the places they live (K-ESS3-1). 

Potential Partners:

The Teton Science Schools (custom youth program) 

The Cougar Fund

K-ESS2-2 Earth?s Systems

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs. 

K-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.

May-June

Students continue to explore the relationships between living things and their environment, which includes all the basic necessities that living things need to survive (K-LS1-1). An exploration into how to use machines to manage human impacts on other living things (K-ESS3-3) will connect back to the lessons at the beginning of the year that focused on forces, speed, energy, and simple machines.

Current Partners:

The Cougar Fund (The Closer You Look y Habitracks)

Students can explore one of our local forests and discuss what the trees need to survive and play a habitat component scavenger hunt game.

Potential Partners:

The JH Children?s Museum

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

K-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures & Processes

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

K-ESS3-3 Earth and Human Activity

Communicate solutions that will manage the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.

The Progression: 1st Grade

August-October

The 1st grade progression begins where the Kindergarten progression ended with designing solutions to human problems, but this time the solutions explored are by mimicking how plants and animals use their external parts (1-LS1-1). 

Current Partners:

The Cougar Fund:

Grand teton National Park:

National Elk Refuge:

Teton Interagency Fire.

1-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures & Processes

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

November-December

The uses of external parts of plants and animals are then connected to the idea of heredity. Then, students explore how parents and offspring share similar, but not exactly the same external parts (1-LS3-1). Students then learn how those external parts are used by parents and offspring in their behaviors to help the offspring survive (1-LS1-2). That transitions to the idea of communication between parents and offspring using sound. 

Potential Partners:

The Cougar Fund:

The Teton Science Schools (custom youth program):

Grand teton National Park:

National Elk Refuge:

1-LS3-1 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

1-LS1-2 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures & Processes

Read texts and use media to determine patterns in the behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.

January-March

Next, students explore sound as vibrating waves, the effects of waves on making things vibrate, and the idea of ears being one of those vibrating receptors of sound waves (1-PS4-1 and 1-PS4-4). The discussion of sound as waves progresses into the discussion of light as waves (1-PS4-2 and 1-PS4-3). 

Current Partners:

The JH Children’s Museum: 

Potential Partners:

The JH Children’s Museum:

Grand Teton National Park:

National Elk Refuge:

Wyoming Stargazing:

1-PS4-1 Waves & Their Application in Technologies for Information Transfer

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

1-PS4-4 Waves & Their Application in Technologies for Information Transfer

Use tools and materials to design and build a device that uses light or sound to solve the problem of communicating over a distance.

1-PS4-2 Waves & Their Application in Technologies for Information Transfer

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects in darkness can be seen only when illuminated.

1-PS4-3 Waves & Their Application in Technologies for Information Transfer

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

April-June

The Sun can then be connected as a star and the source of all daylight on Earth (1-ESS1-2). The amount of daylight changes throughout the year (1-ESS1-2). More distant stars can be seen at night. Patterns of the positions of the Sun, Moon, and stars can be observed (1-ESS1-1). Recommended activities include planetarium shows and activities. 

Current Partners:

Wyoming Stargazing:

1-ESS1-2 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

1-ESS1-1 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Use observations of the sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.

The Progression: 2nd Grade

August-October

The 2nd grade progression begins where the 1st grade progression ends with the Sun and light, this time as a necessity, along with water, for plant  growth (2-LS2-1). The topic then spreads (pun intended) to plants adaptation of seed dispersal and pollination (2-LS2-2) and then naturally to the diversity of life in different habitats (2-LS4-1). Current partners include Teton County Weed & Pest District, Center of Wonder, Teton Science Schools (custom youth program), Grand Teton National Park, Teton Interagency Fire, and the National Elk Refuge. 

2-LS2-1 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow. 

2-LS2-2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.

2-LS4-1 Biological Unity and Diversity

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. 

November-December

The speed of plant growth and seed dispersal can then be contrasted with other Earth processes life wind/water erosion and mountain building (2-ESS1-1 and 2-ESS2-1). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

Grand Teton National Park

Fuego Interagencial de Teton

Potential Partners:

National Elk Refuge. 

2-ESS1-1 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly. 

2-ESS2-1 Earth?s Systems

Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.

January-March

The topic of change from wind and water progresses to the topics of shapes of bodies of water and land features and the distribution of water on Earth in all its states (solid, liquid, gas) (2-ESS2-2 and 2-ESS2-3). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

Grand Teton National Park

Fuego Interagencial de Teton

Potential Partners:

National Elk Refuge

2-ESS2-2 Earth?s Systems

Develop a model to represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area.

2-ESS2-3 Earth?s Systems

Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid, liquid, or gas.

April-June

Heating and cooling water into its three states can be expanded to address how some materials can return to their original state after being heated or cooled while others cannot (2-PS1-4). Then, students explore matter, its different properties, intended purposes, and usefulness (2-PS1-1, 2-PS1-2, 2-PS1-3). 

Current Partners:

Center of Wonder:

Fuego Interagencial de Teton

The Cougar Fund

JH Children’s Museum

Teton Science Schools (Jackson 2nd)

Potential Partners:

The National Elk Refuge

2-PS1-4 Matter and Its Interactions

Construct an argument with evidence that some changes caused by heating or cooling can be reversed and some cannot. 

2-PS1-1 Matter and Its Interactions

Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties. 

2-PS1-2 Matter and Its Interactions

Analyze data obtained from testing different materials to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for the intended purpose.

2-PS1-3 Matter and Its Interactions

Make observations to construct an evidence based account of how an object made of a small set of pieces can be disassembled and made into a new object.

The Progression: 3rd Grade

August-October

The 3rd grade progression begins with an exploration of one of the more peculiar properties of some forms of matter: magnetism and its relationship with electricity (3-PS2-3). Students explore design solutions using magnets (3-PS2-4) and connect those ideas to unbalanced forces and motion (3-PS2-1) while looking for patterns in the motion they observe to predict the future (3-PS2-2). 

Current Partners:

The JH Children?s Museum

3-PS2-3 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other.

3-PS2-4 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.

3-PS2-1 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object. 

3-PS2-2 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Make observations and/or measurements of an object?s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion. 

November-December

The idea of looking for patterns to predict the future is then applied to predicting weather patterns (3-ESS2-1) and design solutions that reduce the impacts of weather-related hazards (3-ESS3-1, 3-5ETS1-(1-3) can also be addressed here as well with the design solution). The idea of weather is then expanded for students to understand more long term patterns of climate (3-ESS2-2). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

Grand Teton National Park

Wyoming Observación de estrellas

3-ESS2-1 Earth?s Systems

Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season. 

3-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity

Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.

3-ESS2-2 Earth?s Systems

Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.

3-5-ETS1-1 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

3-5-ETS1-2 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem. 

3-5-ETS1-3 Engineering, Technology, & Applications of Science

Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

January-February

Cycles of weather and climate progress to the idea of cycles of birth, growth, death, and reproduction in organisms (3-LS1-1). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

Teton County Weed and Pest District

3-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures & Processes

Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death. 

March-April

Students then explore the expression of biological inherited traits (3-LS3-1), variation of characteristics between individuals of a species (3-LS4-2), how those traits are impacted by environments (3-LS3-2), how survival rates vary with different habitats (3LS4-3), group survival behaviors (3-LS2-1), and how changing habitats can also impact survival both at the species and individual levels (3-LS-4-4). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

Teton County Weed and Pest District

Grand Teton National Park

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

The Cougar Fund

Fuego Interagencial de Teton

National Elk Refuge

3-LS3-2 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Use evidence to support the explanation that observable traits can be influenced by the environment.

3-LS4-3 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. 

3-LS4-4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

3-LS4-2 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing. 

3-LS3-1 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms. 

3-LS2-1 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

May-June

Finally, students examine fossils are explore how animals and plants were different long ago (3-LS4-1). 

Current Partners:

Centro de maravilla

3-LS4-1 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago. 

The Progression: 4th Grade

August-October

The 4th grade progression begins where the 3rd grade progression ended with plant/animal adaptations and fossils. Students explore the uses of internal and external structure of plants and animals (4-LS1-1) and the ways animals receive and process information (4-LS1-2). Then, students return to fossils to understand long term changes in the landscape (4-ESS1-1).

Current Partners:

The Cougar Fund

Grand Teton National Park

Snake River Fund

Fuego Interagencial de Teton

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

National Elk Refuge

4-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structure and Processes

Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. 10 Programs

4-LS1-2 From Molecules to Organisms: Structure and Processes

Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways. 1 Programs

4-ESS1-1 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

November-December

The idea of changes in the landscape transfers to looking at evidence of short term weathering from erosion from water or wind on the landscape (4-ESS2-1) and using maps to identify patterns on Earth?s land features (4-ESS2-2). Students then consider the impact of natural Earth processes on humans (4-ESS3-2). 

Current Partners:

Grand Teton National Park

Snake River Fund

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program).

4-ESS2-1 Earth?s Systems

Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation. 4 Programs

4-ESS2-2 Earth?s Systems

Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth?s features. 4 Programs

4-ESS3-2 Earth and Human Activity

Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.

January-March

All of Earth?s natural processes represent examples of the transfer of energy from one form to another just as energy is transferred through a food web. This study of energy examines how an objects? speed is related to their energy (4-PS3-1), how collisions lead to changes in energy (4-PS3-3), how energy can be converted from one form to another (4-PS3-4), and how energy can be transferred by sound, heat, light, and electricity (4-PS3-2). The concept of energy is then related to fuel and the human use of renewable and nonrenewable resources (4-ESS3-1). 

Current Partners:

Grand Teton National Park

JH Children?s Museum

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

4-PS3-1 Energy

Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object. 1 Programs

4-PS3-3 Energy

Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.

4-PS3-4 Energy

Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another. 2 Programs

4-PS3-2 Energy

Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents. 3 Programs

4-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity

Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from renewable and non-renewable resources and how their uses affect the environment.

April-June

Then, the idea of waves are used to unify the previous concepts of the movement of energy, the reflection of light, and the use of patterns to transfer information (4-PS4-1, 4-PS4-2, and 4-PS4-3). 

Current Partners:

Grand Teton National Park

JH Children?s Museum

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

Wyoming Observación de estrellas

4-PS4-1 Waves and Their Applications in Technology for Information Transfer

Develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move.

4-PS4-2 Waves and Their Applications in Technology for Information Transfer

Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen. 1 Programs

4-PS4-3 Waves and Their Applications in Technology for Information Transfer

Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

The Progression: 5th Grade

August-October

The 5th grade progression begins where the 4th grade progression ended with a study of light. This time it is the light from the Sun and the stars. Students explore the apparent brightness of the Sun compared to other stars due to the vast differences in distances from those objects to Earth (5-ESS1-1). Gravitation is an additional concept that dovetails nicely with discussions of stars (5-PS2-1). Students also learn about the seasonal changes in the duration of daylight, the lengths of shadows, and positions of the stars throughout the year (5-ESS1-2). 

Current Partners:

The Teton Science Schools (Teton 5th)

Wyoming Stargazing (Planetarium Shows and Lessons)

5-ESS1-1 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Support an argument that differences in the apparent brightness of the sun compared to other stars is due to their relative distances from Earth. 

5-ESS1-2 Earth?s Place in the Universe

Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky. 

5-PS2-1 Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down. 

November-December

The Sun can then be connected as the source of all the energy that makes up animals? food on Earth (5-PS3-1). Discussion can then progress to photosynthesis and the other two needed elements for that process other than sunlight which are water and air (5-LS1-1). Availability of fresh water and its distribution around the Earth are the next topics for discussion (5-ESS2-2). 

Current Partners:

Teton County Weed and Pest District

Snake River Fund

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

The Cougar Fund

Grand Teton National Park

National Elk Refuge

5-PS3-1 Energy

Use models to describe that energy in animals? food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the Sun. 

5-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structure and Processes

Support an argument that plants get the materials they need for growth primarily from air and water.

5-ESS2-2 Earth?s Systems

Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.  

January-March

These pieces get connected together by considering the movement of matter through the food web (5-LS2-1). Then we zoom out to explore how the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact (5-ESS2-1). Then, the topic moves along to the conservation of Earth?s resources (5-ESS-3-1). 

Current Partners

Teton County Weed and Pest District

Snake River Fund

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

The Cougar Fund

Grand Teton National Park

National Elk Refuge

5-LS2-1 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment. 

5-ESS2-1 Earth?s Systems

Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

5-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity

Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to conserve Earth?s resources and environment. 

April-June

Then, we get to the heart of the matter (pun intended). The properties of matter, its interactions when mixed with other types of matter, and the conservation of mass can be connected back to the beginning of the year with a discussion of how everything that has mass–matter–has gravity (5-PS1-1, 5-PS1-2, 5-PS1-3, 5-PS1-4, and 5-PS2-1). 

Current Partners:

Teton Science Schools (custom youth program)

The JH Children?s Museum. 

Potential Partners:

Wyoming Observación de estrellas

5-PS1-1 Matter and Its Interactions

Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

5-PS1-2 Matter and Its Interactions

Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved. 

5-PS1-3 Matter and Its Interactions

Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

5-PS1-4 Matter and Its Interactions

Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.