Fundraising to Save Our Night Skies

Fundraising to Save Our Night Skies

We’ve just launched a brand new fundraiser to help us begin making a big impact on the light pollution in Jackson! If successful, we’ll be able to begin a series of case studies with local businesses in collaboration with Energy Conservation Works, another local nonprofit, to quantitatively measure the light emitted from various locations around the valley. We’ll also have the resources to begin a full scale educational campaign to bring more awareness to the general public about light pollution.

How It Works

There are a couple different ways you can help us reach our fundraising goals.

  1. You can make a monetary donation through the Crowdrise fundraising platform. They give at least 97% of funds raised to Wyoming Stargazing. Even if you can just afford $10 it helps us out.
  2. You can help us raise funds yourself by setting up a fundraising page on Crowdrise by clicking on this link, selecting the ‘JOIN THE TEAM’ or the ‘FUNDRAISE FOR THIS CAMPAIGN’ links near the bottom of the page that opens up, and sharing your fundraising page across all your social media outlets. If you do that you’ll be entered to win one of three fantastic prizes (including a free private stargazing program for you and 4 guests, an 8" Dobsonian telescope, and Wyoming Stargazing swag). These are all being offered for the fundraisers who raise the most money for Wyoming Stargazing.

Get your fundraising pages set up soon because Giving Tuesday, December 1st, is just around the corner!

What You Get Out of It

In addition to the amazing prizes above, by helping us out you’ll get the satisfaction of joining over 500 people who, over the last two years, have helped us offer 116 Free Public Astronomy Programs including stargazing, solar astronomy, and planetarium programs to over 4,300 people. Plus, your donation will be completely tax deductible.

Sky Quality Meter

What We Get Out of It

If all goes well, we’ll have 20 new Sky Quality Meters ($200/each) and 20 GPS units ($85/each) to measure sky brightness at accurate and precise locations. We’ll also have the funds to start printing brochures, fliers, and other educational materials to bring more widespread attention to the problems associated with light pollution and the benefits of alleviating it.

Visit our Save Our Night Skies page to find out more about why reducing light pollution is so important. If you already know all about this stuff and want to help us out please click one of the links below. Thanks!

Donate to Save Our Night Skies

Join the Fundraising Team to Save Our Night Skies

AmazonSmile

Hello Fellow Supporters of Wyoming Stargazing!

Financially supporting Wyoming Stargazing just got even easier and free!

All you have to do is make all your future Amazon.com purchases from AmazonSmile.  It’s the same Amazon.com that you know and love, but each time you make a purchase from AmazonSmile, Amazon will give Wyoming Stargazing %0.5 of the total purchase amount.  I know that doesn’t sound like much, but it is adds up fast.  

Just click on the following link to get started with supporting Wyoming Stargazing though Smile.Amazon.com: http://smile.amazon.com/ch/46-3183809 

Thanks and Clear Skies!

Parkway Students from St. Louis Missouri

Parkway 2014Last week Wyoming stargazing hosted two stargazing events for about 30 students from Parkway Middle School who were visiting the Teton Science Schools’ Kelly Campus.   The first program, which was held on Tuesday evening, ended at 9:30pm because the students needed get back to bed after a long day.  After an indoor presentation we went outside and checked out Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Neither the students nor their teachers were satisfied with just seeing the planets in the sky which was just beginning to get dark.  So, they asked if I would come back later in the week during the middle of the night in order to be able to see some deep space objects in a really dark sky.  I loved that idea.  

I returned on Friday night at 1:30am to a group of about 20 of the students who were willing to interrupt their sleep for some astronomy.  They had an incredible time viewing the Trifid Nebula, the Swan Nebula, the Ring Nebula, The Hercules Globular Cluster, the Andromeda Galaxy, and of course Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. 

At about 3:30am the students were about ready to head back to sleep.  One of them stepped forward and thanked me for teaching them about astronomy and inspiring them to learn more about science.  She held out her hand, pressed two one-dollar bills into my hand and said, “this is for your organization.”  Then, every one of her classmates followed suite and handed me one or two dollars as a donation for Wyoming Stargazing.  I started to cry. Enough said.